Mountain Heroes: Guest Post with Misty Beller!

Today on the blog, historical romance author Misty Beller is here to talk about all things books and research and swoony heroes to celebrate the release of her latest novel, Hope’s Highest Mountain. Enjoy getting to know more about her and her writing style!

Amy: Thanks for joining us, Misty! What do you think makes a mountain-man hero who is loved by both readers and the heroine?

Misty: Ooo, this is a great question! When I’m writing a mountain man hero, I always wonder what it was that drove him into the wilderness to live by himself. Did a deep wound force him to want a life totally different than anything he was accustomed to? Or maybe he just loves the mountain country and craves adventure. The majestic grandeur of the Rockies has seeped into his soul and feeds his spirit like nothing else can. I think the best-loved mountain man is probably a combination of all of these! Micah Bradley from Hope’s Highest Mountain definitely fits that bill.

I imagine the ideal mountain man to be the strong, silent type—he would definitely have to be an introvert to be content living with minimal human interaction! And no matter how wounded (emotionally or otherwise), no matter how bitter from the scars of his past, his protective instincts have to be strong. He has to be willing to fight through any obstacle to protect those around him—especially the heroine!

Amy: Love it! Micah is a great example of that trait. Is there a fun historical fact you came across while researching Hope’s Highest Mountain that you’d like to share?

Misty: Hmm…I’m a history nerd, so every time I get to research, I find fun facts! Surprisingly, not everything I consider fun is a fun fact for “normal” people. For Hope’s Highest Mountain, I got to research so many things about smallpox, including what the disease looks like at each stage, the differences between smallpox and chicken pox, and the history of the vaccination (which included lots of milk maids and a few young children). As I was trying to choose which of these to share here, I decided it might be better to switch gears.

Let me tell you about puppies! Namely, the history of the cute little dog named Shadow who plays a starring role in the story. Shadow is a sweet little male Havanese, solid black and the runt of the litter. We also have two Havanese (in real life), so I’m pretty family with the current version of the breed.

I knew for the story to be accurate though, I would need to do some quick research on what the breed would have looked like back in the 1860s. They actually would have been called Bichons back then (not Bichon Frise, which is another breed that spun off from the original Bichons). For several centuries, they were bred on the island of Cuba, but vacationing Europeans discovered the dog there and helped spread the breed abroad. One of those sweet little puppies even made it all the way to the mountain wilderness of the Montana Territory! (wink)

Amy: I’m sure both the smallpox and the dog research were helpful as you wrote, but this is a good excuse for puppy pictures! Now, what do you most admire about early pioneers like the ones in your books?

Misty: The men and women who thrived on the frontier were amazing! They weren’t just living without modern conveniences and technology. They were living far from “civilization,” often far from family and church. Yet they built these strong lives, homes, marriages, families, and relationships with God. The challenges they faced made them stronger, developing them into people I respect wholeheartedly.

Amy: That’s such a great summary. And for those of you who’d like to hear Misty share more about her book, you can watch this short video!

So, readers, let’s talk heroes: what for you are the traits that make a fictional hero endearing or worth cheering for?

Love Comes Softly Through the Years

Hello, readers! I’m Brooke, the fiction marketing assistant at Bethany House, and I am posting on the blog this week while my colleague Amy Green is on vacation. 

Let’s talk for a moment about the year 1979. The price of a gallon of gas was still under a dollar and big hair styles were trending, but at Bethany House, one of our favorite 1979 things is Love Comes Softly. That’s right, the first edition of the well-loved prairie romance by Janette Oke was published by Bethany House 40 years ago! In celebration, we released a new paperback edition in August of this year, as well as a new hardcover (a special collector’s edition) that released a few weeks ago in early September. With these new editions, I’ve been thinking with nostalgia of the various cover designs of Love Comes Softly that I saw growing up.

Copy of Copy of #DescribeABookPlotBadly

Travel through time with me and take a gander at the Love Comes Softly cover designs through the years. I asked Paul Higdon, our art director, about the changes to the most recent cover – see what he has to say below.

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New in 2019:

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I asked Paul Higdon, art director for Bethany House, about the new cover design and why he and the designers chose this new direction.

“When you think of the prairie, the quintessential feel is the sun beating down on the prairie so that’s why we tended to go with yellow for the warm feel, and why we still went with warm colors,” Paul said. “Into the early 2010s, we had what we call the ‘big head’ trend, where the character’s head takes up most of the cover. This has trended away, and the new trend is a full-figure depiction of the main character. It looks more realistic, and that way you can still capture the setting to pull the reader in. It’s more modern.”

I hope you all enjoy the new cover design (and the story inside the covers) as much as I do!

#DescribeABookPlotBadly

51152198_2055104334570014_2023964099418783744_nHello, readers! I’m Rachael Wing, the copywriter and “Instagram guru” at Bethany House (right). Amy Green is currently travelling the world and living her lifelong dream of searching for elves and Hobbits, so I’m taking over the blog this week!

If you grab a Bethany House book and flip to the back, you will find the recommended titles—or as we call them, the back-of-book ads (BOBs for short). As the company’s copywriter, one of my main responsibilities is to write those short descriptions. I take what has been written by the authors and editorial department for the books’ short summaries (which appears on Amazon and other retail sites), and have to summarize that in 360 characters or less . . . including spaces. Counting the fiction titles only, I write approximately 20 of these every four months—but counting our nonfiction divisions, I spend over a week writing  approximately 60 of these—so as you can imagine, there is always writer’s block involved, and they don’t always turn out poetically.

#DescribeABookPlotBadly (1)

Inspired by the old Twitter trend #DescribeAFilmPlotBadly and my personal work struggles, I decided to intentionally write terrible short synopses about some of my favorite classic stories to give you an idea of how my first drafts usually turn out—and hopefully a good laugh!

 

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Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen: Broody uptown boy falls for feisty downtown girl, and his knack for throwing money at problems softens his terrible manners.

 

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Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare: Family drama! Slacking servants! Two teenagers are great at falling in love but terrible at coordinating death plans.

 

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Les Misérables by Victor Hugo: Police officer with the greatest thirst for vengeance and the worst tracking abilities hunts the same criminal for years. Also includes a very detailed description of the French sewer system.

 

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley: A lonely monster with thrifted body and a murder complex is desperate for the perfect girl.

 

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Little Women by Louisa May Alcott: Boy-next-door loves his neighbors so much that he ends up settling for the worst sister.

 

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Great Expectations by Charles Dickens: Old lady cannot properly handle her breakup, so she keeps her grudges. And her moldy wedding cake.

 

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Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss: Children are taught about peer pressure through a strange creature who learns why it’s important to accept odd food from annoying strangers.

 

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The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien: A group of diverse dudes decide to cash in on a jewelry return in exchange for the fate of the world.

 

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Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë: The classic case of falling in love with your boss, who “forgets” to tell you about his crazy wife in the attic.

 

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Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery: The uplifting story of a girl who poisons her best friend, can’t dye hair, and has questionable fashion sense.

How would you describe some of your favorite classic tales?

Five Ways to Make Time for Reading

(This week’s post is from our fantastic summer intern, Jessica Pollard. Enjoy her tips!)

Let’s face it. Life is always going to be busy. Even though everyone says summer is the time to relax, you will always have lawn to mow, gardens to weed, and windows to clean. Not to mention no one can remember the last time the pantry was cleaned.

To help you escape the woes of summer cleaning and busy schedules, here are five ways you can make time in your life so you can soak in the summer rays with your favorite book.

Always Carry a Book

Everywhere is a good place to read: the doctor’s office, a sporting event, or even a road trip. (Unless you are driving. You’ll have to settle for an audiobook instead.) We waste so much time between events scrolling on our phones or gazing awkwardly into space. With a handy book in your purse or car, you can save your battery and look sophisticated at the same time. If you think books are too clunky to carry around (or don’t want to save your battery or look sophisticated), you can always have a few ebooks on your mobile device so that instead of mindlessly playing that game you’ve played a million times, you can go on new adventures with your newest character-friends.

Audiobooks

Some summer cleaning is inevitable. Trust me, trying to find an onion for wild rice soup is easier if you don’t have to venture through the menacing forest that grew around them. (Yes, I speak from experience.) However, you can make the work more enjoyable if you spend it with your favorite characters listening to audiobooks. Crossing stuff off your to-do list and reading books at the same time! You will be crowned the best multitasker in the world. Maybe you can even imaging you are the character as they make dinner or clean the house along with you.

Read What You Love

Yes, this may seem obvious at first glance. Of course, you should read what you love…but think of all the things you do read when you are “too busy” to read a book. Random news articles, your social media feed, bills. It only takes one masterfully woven page-turner to keep your attention hooked for hours. You will wonder how you ever claimed you didn’t have time for books. You may also wonder what sleep is.

(WARNING: Sleep is necessary for human function. Follow your doctor’s advice. But then again, if you really need to know who killed that guy…I guess you can read one more chapter…Someone else was killed? Okay, one more…What just happened??? Only two more chapters this time…Whoops, that’s the end of that book. But there was a cliffhanger…I guess you can start the next one.)

Set Goals

As with most things in life, you will get more done if you set goals (and stick to them). You will be amazed how many pages you can read while you’re brushing your teeth, making dinner, or before you go to bed if you know that reading 54 more pages will allow you to check the little box on your list. Making color-coded charts and spreadsheets to chart your progress can be as motivating as a to-do list.

(WARNING: Making color-coded charts and spreadsheets is addictive. You don’t want them to cut into your valuable reading time. It’s best to listen to an audiobook while making them.)

Be Challenged by Peers

If following through on your goals is not your forte, there’s nothing like a little peer pressure to keep you reading. Join a book club or start one with some friends. You don’t want to be the one who shows up to the meeting and responds “Well…you see…” when asked if you thought the main character was justified when she decided to go on a date with Bill instead on Rob in chapter nine. Trust me, you want to avoid the judgmental stares of book-lovers. Their gazes won’t stop after the meeting is over. They will follow you. Everywhere. For the rest of your life.

I think cleaning the pantry can wait for next month.

I hope these tips will inspire you to read more this summer. How do you make time for reading in your life?

How I Became a Fantasy Writer

Almost every writer I’ve met said they wanted to be a writer since they were young. At age six, I wanted to be a unicorn. A beautiful, magical unicorn. That should tell you where my life was heading from an early start.

My earliest book memories were my mother reading to us the children’s version of Pilgrim’s Progress and The Chronicles of Narnia. In fact, I couldn’t wait until the next night to find out what happened to the Pevensie siblings, so I found my mother’s copy and hid in a corner and finished it that afternoon.

As the years went by, I added more fantasy to my collection, starting with The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. My father was a fantasy nerd before it was cool and introduced me to even more stories: Dune, Conan, A Princess of Mars, and many others. When I wasn’t reading, I was imagining. So it’s no surprise that eventually I started writing my own stories.

In 2004, shortly after the birth of my daughter, I needed a creative outlet. My husband always said I should be a writer. I usually turned him down. I was a reader, not a writer. But then I had this idea and I couldn’t escape it. I started writing about this woman who could see inside people’s souls with a touch of her hand. Using the fantasy genre, I explored what it would be like if we could see people the way God sees people: both the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Years later, that story became my first published book: Daughter of Light. Since then, I’ve continued to write in the speculative genre. I always thought the Frankenstein story was a great story about how we should be careful of what we invent, and how the monster wanted to be loved. So I wrote a similar story about a young woman who—because of science—is turning into a monster from the inside out using a unique genre called steampunk (steampunk is a story set in a Victorian or Wild West era with a high level of technology ran on steam). A year later, Tainted came out, which won the Realm Award for best steampunk and Awakened, the following book, won the Carol Award for best Christian speculative.

It took years for me to embrace the fact that I love fantasy, and that there is nothing wrong with that genre. In fact, the next generation is desperately looking for something beyond our world. Just look at the books and movies young people read and watch. And what better way to introduce them to God (who is the most fantastical!), than with stories set in amazing worlds, filled with flawed and searching people, who find light and hope.

Along with writing fantasy, I attend an amazing conference every year for writers of faith who write specifically in the fantasy and science fiction genres, Realm Makers. It’s probably the only writing conference where you will find people walking around in geeky shirts, debating the eating habits of dragons, and dressing up as their favorite characters for the awards banquet. I have a steampunk outfit I wear especially for the occasion. It’s one of the highlights of my year!

Looking back, I never did become a unicorn. Instead, I became a fantasy writer. Which is almost the same thing. Then again, those silver hairs I see starting to peek out at the top of my head could be an indication that my dream just might be coming true.

 

Thanks so much for sharing your story with us, Morgan! Readers, you can check out the first chapter of Mark of the Raven, or visit Morgan’s website for more about her and her books. What is a favorite character from a fantasy novel you’ve read?

Guest Post: When a Book Cover Comes to Life by Regina Jennings

(When I saw Regina’s fun travel album on Facebook, I knew she had to share the fun with all of us here on the blog. Enjoy!)

The wonder of reading a well-written historical novel is that feeling that we’ve stepped into a world that now only exists in the pages of a book. Then again, sometimes history is resurrected, and it’s just as glorious as you’d hoped.

In late September, the U.S. Cavalry Association held their Bivouac and National Cavalry Competition at Fort Reno, Oklahoma—the setting of my current series. Once again, the fort sounded with pounding hooves, stirring bugles, and that bluster and swagger that occurs before any contest. Now, I’m always supportive of events that honor our past, but this was at the fort…my fort! It was like I was standing beside Louisa and Major Adams watching the goings-on at the parade grounds.

In Holding the Fort, most of the story takes place in the General’s House, which was the residence of the highest-ranking officer on the post. The General’s House had a central view of the parade grounds where the men drilled.

Here, in front of the General’s House, a participant competes in the Mounted Saber competition. The obstacle course includes spearing rings on the blade, slicing through apples, popping balloons and stabbing targets on the ground.

Another competition was Military Field Jumping. Behind this soldier you can see the long barracks that the troopers like Bradley Willis stayed in.

Besides combat horsemanship, mounted sabers, and military field jumping, they were also judged on the authenticity of the era they were portraying. Participants had several different categories that they could choose from. Naturally, I was drawn to those portraying soldiers from the Plains Indian Campaigns, since that’s the time I’m writing about.

These two soldiers are currently stationed at Fort Carson, but they were representing troopers from Fort Concho, Texas, during the Plains Indian Conflicts.

They are judged on the historical detail of their uniforms, weapons, gear, and tack. Finding these guys is a researcher’s dream! I learned that they would’ve carried more ammunition than food, but if you have ammo, usually you can get food. There’s not much room in those bags for fluff, but they liked having both a canteen and a tin cup.

And even though it was a toasty day, they favor the caped overcoat when they want to make an impression. I have to agree with them.

See the heart on the breast collar of the horse –

According to these presenters, the heart meant that the horse had already seen combat. Is that true? I haven’t found that referenced anywhere else, but I’m open to the possibility.

My meeting with these guys set up the moment that will always be one of my favorite writer memories– the time my book cover came to life. A member of their unit was competing in the Mounted Saber course, when I realized that it was a scene straight out of my book The Lieutenant’s Bargain (releasing Dec. 4th).

See that house behind him?

See the house on my book cover?

It’s the same! And while Lieutenant Jack isn’t wearing his caped coat on the cover, you’d better believe it’s a big part of the story!

I’m so grateful that our military encourages their young members to keep the legacy of their units alive through events like this, and I’m doubly grateful that they choose to hold the contests at historical sites. I’d imagine if walls could talk, the buildings at Fort Reno would say that they miss the rowdy cavalrymen and the spirited horses that used to populate their grounds.

There’s just something right about bringing the cavalry back to Fort Reno.

Thanks, Regina! And readers, if you haven’t been introduced to her Fort Reno series, now is the perfect time…the ebook of Book One, Holding the Fort, is on sale for $1.99 for October 2018. Check it out!

Have you ever visited a place that was also the setting of a favorite book? What similarities did you notice?

5 Signs That You’re a Booklover

Today on our blog, we have a special guest: Serena Hanson, a life-long reader and our Bethany House summer intern. She’s got some great ways to diagnose your addiction to books. See how many apply to you!

You know you’re a Booklover if you show these common symptoms:

1. You suffer from distraction.

When you’re in the middle of a good novel, it can be very difficult to focus on ordinary tasks. It can be a small, nagging sensation in the back of your mind that you’re missing something. Or it can be full-blown obsession over getting home to find out how in the world the main character is going to get out of the mess he’s in. Either way, it is very distracting.

2. You are unable to stop reading.

If you find yourself constantly thinking, “just one more chapter,” you’re a Booklover. Once you start a novel, it’s almost impossible to stop. You may find yourself looking at the clock, only to think: “Sure, it’s one in the morning, but I need to know if his message was in time to save his love from her kidnapper!” Or you might walk around the house unable to tear yourself away from the book in your hands, bumping into doorframes and answering in monosyllables whenever anyone speaks to you. Many Booklovers have also been known to burn their dinners by attempting to read and cook at the same time.

3. You get book hangovers.

Have you ever finished a good novel and felt like you can’t quite adjust back to reality? You walk around for the next few hours or days in a slight haze, irritable, slightly depressed, and just not yourself. The fact is, you’re not yourself. Part of you is still stuck between the pages of that novel. You haven’t fully returned to this world yet.

4. Friends and family members notice that you talk to yourself.

Okay, you’re not actually talking to yourself. You’re talking to book characters. The novel gets exciting, and you just can’t contain yourself. I know that I’m definitely guilty of this one.

If you have said any of the following to a printed page, you are a prime candidate for a Booklover diagnosis:

  • “Nooooooo!”
  • “Can’t you see that it’s a trap?”
  • “He’s lying to you! She doesn’t love Randall. She never did!”
  • “Wow buddy, even I saw that coming.” Or, vice versa: “Oh my goodness! I never even guessed!”
  • “Get in there and tell her how you feel!”
  • “Shoulda listened to me five chapters ago and you wouldn’t be in this mess.”
  • “So beautiful.” *sniff sniff* “I knew this day would come.”

5. You experience random outbursts of crying.

Other people might look at you in surprise, but you know that your tears are completely justified. The protagonist’s brother has just died, or two lovers have parted never to see each other again, or the faithful golden retriever fell off a cliff trying to save a baby, or any number of horrible things! Seriously, they should have a warning label on books: “May cause tears and/or the desire to drown your sorrows in chocolate.”

If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should seek advice at your local bookstore immediately. There is no known cure for this condition, but don’t panic. It is very common and is not life threatening. In fact, some even say that it enhances your life (and if they do, they’re probably Booklovers themselves).

Okay, readers, time to share: which Booklover symptom do you relate to most?

I’m Serena Hanson, the summer fiction intern at Bethany House Publishers and a confirmed Booklover. I’ve loved stories since before I can remember, from my mom reading me board books about raisins and strollers to devouring full-length novels as I grew up. As a girl, my favorite pastime was sitting in a hammock I made out of a bed sheet, reading whatever new book I’d found at the library.

Inside the Book World: Interview with Anna Henke

Today on the blog we have a special guest: Anna Henke, a writer who’s an expert in the magic of intriguing and hooking readers with fantastic copy. Readers, enjoy this inside peek at another part of the publishing process, and writers, read on to learn why it matters to craft those marketing sentences perfectly.

Amy: Tell us about your background in the world of publishing and copywriting.

Anna: I worked as a copywriter at Bethany House for six years before branching out into my own copywriting business, The Resident Writer, where I serve self-published authors by creating cover copy that captures attention. I’m now broadening my clientele to include a wider range of creative people, but books have always held my heart. That’s why I got into publishing in the first place.

Amy: How is the blurb on the back cover different from the synopsis of a book that authors include in their manuscript proposal?

Anna: It’s so different! Or at least it should be. The synopsis of the book is just a play-by-play of what’s going to happen. The blurb on the back needs to be strategically written to give out just enough nuggets to entertain and intrigue without giving away any twists or surprises. The cover copy should set the stage, not tell the story. That’s my approach for fiction.

Amy: That’s a great way of putting it. You’ve mentioned the need for strategy…so why does back cover copy matter from your perspective?

Anna: It matters because it’s what seals the deal for most people! The author or the cover draws them in, whether they are buying in person or online. But it’s the blurb on the back that reveals just enough of the story that determines whether a purchase is made. If the purchase is being made online, the description is even more critical. Think about the last time you bought a book online. Sure, you clicked on the cover. But what made you really want the book? THE DESCRIPTION. It’s everything.

Amy: As a reader myself, I totally agree with that. Thinking about writing that description, it seems like a huge challenge to take a full novel and condense it into just a paragraph or two. Where do you usually start, and what does your process look like from there? Or is it different for each book?

Anna: I obviously start by reading the manuscript. I make a few notes of phrases I like for taglines and major plot points. Then I sit down with those notes and really have a think. What is the most compelling part of this book? What leads up to that? Anything beyond that point I completely leave off the cover. I try to match the tone to that of the author’s, which is when my notes come in handy. I also like to use an actual phrase from the book as a headline if possible. I just let it flow from that point!

Amy: You make it sound so easy, but I know from talking to writers and editors that it’s not! 🙂 Are there any common mistakes you see when authors write their own copy?

Anna: The most common mistake is treating back cover copy like a standard synopsis instead of a marketing blurb. It all goes back to your second question. They are two different things. Many authors just summarize the book and leave it at that. But it needs to be compelling. It should represent the book well. And also, genre really matters for cover copy. Authors should research bestselling blurbs in their niche before writing their own, because each genre has patterns that should be followed unless you want to stick out like a sore thumb.

Thanks for joining us, Anna! Readers, do you notice the copy on book covers? (There’s a person behind it—and if it’s from a traditional publisher, it’s not the author. It’s probably a copywriter like Anna.) Writers, is there anything you’ve ever wanted to ask a copywriter? Let Anna know in the comments!

Anna Henke is the woman behind the blog and the business The Resident Writer. With a background in publishing and copywriting, she helps female entrepreneurs clarify their message, connect with their ideal clients, and capture sales through captivating copy that converts. Learn more and at www.theresidentwriter.com.

Inside the Book World: Interview with Christine Sharbrough

Hello, readers! Today we have a special guest joining us on the blog. Christine is a strong advocate for Christian fiction, a super-cool librarian who always has a book recommendation, and and all-around delightful person to know. And in addition to all of that, she’s a reviewer for Library Journal, so as part of our new series interviewing people behind the scenes, Christine offered to let us in on more of what she does. Enjoy!

Amy: What would you say is your favorite part about reviewing for Library Journal?

Christine: The five years that I have been reviewing for LJ (and over 600 books reviewed, not counting the ones I read and do not review), has been an honor and pleasure to give back to the library community. I have to admit that being one of the first to see the new titles and new authors is a thrill every single time.

Amy: 600 books! That’s incredible! And yes, I totally understand the excitement of opening a galley months before a book officially releases.

Let’s get into the actual writing of reviews. How do you decide what to say in the evaluative part of the review? Especially if you didn’t care for the book, how can you tell if it just isn’t for you or if it objectively could have been better?

Christine: Because librarians use LJ as a source for purchases, LJ asks that we not include reviews of books that are purely negative. Now, that may give readers pause…and make authors wonder if they didn’t make it into the Journal because their books are terrible. Not so. We are limited by space constraints and therefore are limited to the number of reviews that can be included in the print journal. As a librarian, I want books that are timely, relevant, that fill a hole in my collection or augment a popular one. I am looking for a fresh take on an existing genre or a new voice that throws me a curve.

Amy: Too many books…such a great problem to have! So, when you explain to others that you read and review Christian fiction, what are some stereotypes that you’ve encountered?

Christine: From clergy most times I’m scoffed at and told that there is no such thing! From non-readers of the genre sometimes I can pique a reader’s curiosity, but sometimes I get the eyes widening and backing away slowly. It can be a tremendous conversation stopper. Mostly it’s the stereotype of preachy evangelizing that makes people worry. I have found that it’s a 70/30 split: among those who haven’t heard of Christian fiction, about 70% have no interest, and 30% would be interested if I can give them the right recommendation. This is when it pays to know your audience and your authors’ writing styles.

Amy: We’re glad you do! You mentioned stereotypes that are no longer true. What is the biggest change that you’ve appreciated in inspirational fiction over the years?

Christine: I believe the biggest change I’ve noticed is the broadening of the subgenres. This is great news for readers who are used to a variety of subgenres in their fiction diets. Reading inspirational fiction does not mean that you are limited to Amish or romance, which is a common misconception. There’s something out there for everyone.

Amy: That’s one of the things I love about looking at the fiction titles on display at a Christian bookstore. So much variety! That said, is there anything you’d like to see (or would like to see more of) in the future?

Christine: I would like to see more contemporary fiction that deals with hard issues. Obviously, those issues can be difficult to address well, but I believe readers of any genre should be able to find themselves in a book.

Thanks so much for joining us, Christine! Readers, what Christian fiction books have you read recently that address hard issues? (Even though Christine mentioned contemporary in particular, feel free to include historical titles.)

 

Can You Judge a Book by its Cover? Guest Post from Elizabeth Camden

It’s an old question: Can you judge a book by its cover?

My answer: Yes! Especially if it is a book by Bethany House.

A book’s cover is the first thing a potential reader will see and it should make a lasting impression within the space of a few seconds. A great cover will help the reader instantly recognize the genre, tone, and setting of a book. For example, if you look at the covers below, you can probably tell which novels are in a genre you are interested in:

An Elegant Façade is falls directly into the regency romance category and is likely to appeal to Jane Austen fans. A Dangerous Legacy is still a historical, but the tone is a little more turbulent and promises a stormy romance. A Love Like Ours is clearly a contemporary, with a vibe that blends both humorous and a down-home western feel. Return to Me communicates a traditional biblical fiction novel with an epic feel to it.

Once upon a time cover designers could pour a lot of detail into the cover image, but with the rise of online shopping, it is essential a book cover look good both on a bookstore shelf and a thumbnail image on a smart phone. The physical copy of a Bethany House novel is 8 ½ inches tall. If a potential reader is looking at the same book on an iPhone, the cover will only be ¾” tall. That presents a huge challenge for the designer. It means the titles need to be shorter, details are streamlined, and backgrounds can’t be too busy.

With all those limitations, it is amazing that designers can still produce such diversity that communicates a genre and vibe so quickly.

Although authors rarely have much say in our covers, the team of professionals in a publishing company are experts in picking out color palettes, symbolism, and design elements to convey these messages in the space of only a few seconds. The cover is making a promise to the reader about what sort of experience they can expect once they open the page, which is why Bethany House puts so much attention on designing that image. People really do judge a book by its cover!

Thanks for joining us, Elizabeth! (Here she is becoming part of her latest cover.)

What about you? What is your favorite book cover in recent memory?