May 2020 New Releases

Need to travel through the pages of a book? These spring releases have you covered. By opening the pages, you can hunt butterflies on an expedition to India, roam the Canadian prairie, find love in the beautiful Blue Ridge mountains, and explore Gilded Age New York City. We love this collection of books and hope that you find the perfect novel to keep you turning pages late into the night. Click on a cover to read an excerpt, and enjoy!

 

A Mosaic of Wings by Kimberly Duffy

Plot Summary: Determined to uphold her father’s legacy, newly graduated Nora Shipley joins an entomology research expedition to India to prove herself in the field. In this spellbinding new land, Nora is faced with impossible choices—between saving a young Indian girl and saving her career, and between what she’s always thought she wanted and the man she’s come to love.

 

Unyielding Hope by Janette Oke and Laurel Oke Logan

When Hope Calls #1

Plot Summary: In this sweeping companion to the Hallmark TV series When Hope Calls, Lillian Walsh rushes to a reunion after discovering the sister she believed dead is likely alive. But Grace has big dreams beyond anything Lillian is prepared for. Can Lillian set aside her own plans and join her sister in an adventure that will surely change them both?

 

Stay With Me by Becky Wade

A Misty River Romance

Plot Summary: Led to her hometown by a mysterious letter, Genevieve Woodward wakes in an unfamiliar cottage with the confused owner staring down at her. The last thing Sam Turner wants is to help a woman as troubled as she is talkative, but he can’t turn her away when she needs him most. Will they be able to let go of the façades and loneliness they’ve always clung to?

 

Storing Up Trouble by Jen Turano

American Heiresses #3

Plot Summary: When Beatrix Waterbury’s train is disrupted by a heist, scientist Norman Nesbit comes to her aid. After another encounter, he is swept up in the havoc she always seems to attract—including the attention of the men trying to steal his research—and they’ll soon discover the curious way feelings can grow between two very different people in the midst of chaos.

 

Have you read a book that inspired you to visit the setting in person? Tell us about it.

Prayer for Authors: May 2020

Since it’s the first Sunday of the month, we’ll be continuing the Bethany House Fiction tradition of taking time to pray for authors who have new releases coming out this month. I’m Amy Green, the fiction publicist here, and I’m thankful for all of the readers who show their support for our authors in the way that matters most: by praying for them. To read more about the reasons behind this time of prayer, go to this post.

Prayer

Authors with Books Releasing in May:

Kimberly Duffy
Laurel Oke Logan
Janette Oke
Jen Turano
Becky Wade

Verse of the Month: Feel free to use the text of this verse to guide your prayers for these authors, as well as other people in your life who you want to remember in prayer today.

A thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I have come so that they may have life and have it in abundance.”—John 10:10 (CSB)

General Suggestions for Prayer:

  • For endurance in times when motivation and creativity is wearing thin.
  • For a special blessing on these books and the messages of hope they contain.
  • For Christian booksellers who are experiencing and hard time financially right now.

It’s so great that, in these trying times, we can go together to God in prayer. Thanks for joining us!

Top Ten Things We Miss While Working From Home

At Bethany House, there are four marketing team members who work exclusively on fiction (plus Rachael who we claim because even though she writes copy for fiction and nonfiction, she reads a ton of fiction). While we’re very grateful we can work from home and keep amazing books coming to you, each of us shared two things we miss about being in-office…read on and you might discover some things you didn’t know about Bethany House’s work culture.

Amy, Fiction Publicist

The Lunch Table: Anywhere from 4-10 of us eat lunch around 12:30 most days, and after comparing lunches (the healthy salad, the tasty takeout, the bowl of Lucky Charms—with unicorns!—the half-eaten food from an editor’s kid he didn’t want to throw out) the topics of conversation range from informative to ridiculous. I miss my restaurant recommendations, random trivia, discussion of different punctuation marks, and even the conversations about sports.

Vocab Points and Faux-cab Points: Rachael’s office door is filled with sticky notes, each emblazoned with an impressive word a co-worker used in actual conversation or a meeting. Beneath them are the “faux-cab” points, which are words co-workers used that aren’t really words at all, sometimes accidentally blurted out, sometimes used because the real word proved elusive (“moistrous” instead of “humid”), sometimes invented intentionally because it should be a word. These past several weeks, I’ve paused a few times after using a particularly appropriate word…but there was no one to celebrate it with me.

Serena, Fiction Marketing Assistant

Break Walks: Once the weather is tolerably nice—and sometimes when it’s not so nice—we like to use our breaks to go on walks together. It’s nice to get a little exercise and a chance to chat with my lovely coworkers… unless we decide to try a new direction and end up traipsing through a golf course and down a dirt road for an hour trying to get back to the office. Yes, that did happen. (Amy: okay, that one was my fault. Oops.)

My Lovely Coworkers: I love working with the team at Bethany House, and I miss seeing their faces every day. I miss popping over to Brooke’s desk to ask if a shipment of author items arrived and the random gatherings of people in the hallway because someone is telling a funny story or has a picture of their newborn niece.

Brooke, Fiction Marketing Assistant

Puns: Is it strange to say that I miss hearing Amy Green’s puns? Many a team meeting has been had with Amy interjecting purposeful puns and then shaking her head after and saying it was “so bad” and I really shouldn’t laugh. (I think puns are great and remain undiscouraged in my amusement.) I eagerly await hearing more puns in-person.

Good ‘Ole Brainstorming Sessions: I’m blessed to be on a team of crazy-smart people who are willing to share their ideas and time with me. Whether I’m desperate for a fresh idea for a promotional item to fit a new title or whether we’re problem-solving something new as a team, I know I can come away with something to un-stick me if I’m stuck. Email and Zoom are great in the meantime, but I look forward to brainstorming in the office again and feeling the ideas spark around the room.

Rachael, Copywriter and Instagram Coordinator

Physical Books: While packing my office up to prepare for staying at home, I made sure to grab all the physical books I thought I’d need for the weeks to come—I even printed off manuscripts of not-yet-printed books! But even with that kind of preparation, I still find myself missing my bookcase and the easy access to whichever books I need to reference . . . as well as Brooke, my book fairy, (as I have nicknamed her) who delivers our new releases, hot-off-the-press, to my door!

Instagram Days: At least once a month, I distract Amy and Brooke for an afternoon or evening, and use them as hand models or book-balancers. We get many odd looks from passersby as we attempt new ideas and wander around with armloads of props and books. It’s not nearly as fun trying to photograph alone without witty comments and genius ideas.

Noelle, Marketing Director

My Fiction Team: My team of savvy ladies collectively inspire and intimidate me in the best of ways with their creativity and perspectives. The positive force of that just doesn’t translate as well over email: the new selection from Serena’s delightful hat collection, having Enya run through my head everytime when Amy mutters her oft-used phrase “who can say?” the very sweet Brooke appearing at my door with her mischievous finger tapping, or Rachael’s infectious giggles from down the hall.

The Free Stuff: There are certain counters in our office that are unofficially deemed the free sections (so be careful to not accidentally leave something on them). I’ve picked up so many delightful and random things there, including large home-grown zucchini, new car floor mats, pots for plants, cute woven baskets, a Christmas green table cloth, and a pack of gum. But these areas are known to feature not only items, but food (home baked and otherwise), encouraging many dashes. Though the extreme nature of these has seen its peak in past days*, there is still nothing like having free goodies be announced and hear the excitement resound throughout the office as each person reads his/her email. But beware if you take too long to read your email, lest it all be gone. Sure, I can make my own cookies at home, but where is the surprise in that?

*insert memory of poking my head out of my office after hearing a ruckus to find abandoned shoes in the hallway. Apparently they were deemed too much a hindrance to getting their owner quickly to the chocolate that had been announced available for consumption.

I hope you enjoyed these as much as I did! Is there anything you’ll be excited about being able to do once we can meet in groups in person, work-related or otherwise?

Make Your Home Into a Library in These Seven Easy Steps

This week is National Library Week, but since most libraries around the country are closed (or doing curbside pickup), I thought of an alternate way to celebrate. You, yes you, can pay homage to every reader’s favorite location by creating a temporary library in your home. Here are the simple steps to accomplishing this.

One: Name your library.

Honestly, library names are probably the least creative aspect of their existence. Usually, it’s the town/community followed by “Library,” which is great for clarity, but not for hinting at the epic wonder just beyond their doors. When naming your library, I suggest the following process:

The [Column 1] [Your Last Name or Street Name] [Column 2] [Column 3]

Column 1

Astounding
Literary
Incredible
Maze-Like
Vast

Column 2

Treasure Trove
Knowledge Repository
Novel Archive
Reader Haven
Book Fortress

Column 3

Of Unending Merit
From Ages Past
To Preserve Wisdom for the Future
Portal to New Worlds
With Volumes Untold

 

Two: Choose a librarian.

The job qualifications are that this person must be patient, organized, and know basically everything, from where to find books for a school report on termites to the title of that one mystery a patron saw last year with yellow on the cover. Memorizing the Dewey Decimal system is optional, but recommended.

 

Three: More books. More bookshelves.

A pandemic is a great time to stock up on essential reading supplies. (If you’re an ebook reader, we love you and your method is totally valid, but possibly lacking in the “homey library aesthetic” department.) If a member of your household questions your new practice, it’s time to bring out your “There’s No Such Thing As Too Many Books” speech. (I hope you have one. If not, let me know and I’ll let you borrow mine, just know there’s an interpretive dance with lots of frantic gestures at the end of paragraph five.)

 

Four: Create your own library card.

In fact, make an application process. I always thought it was crazy that the only thing you had to do to get access to the knowledge of the ages was live in a community. Such unfathomable riches should only lie at the end of an arduous quest! My suggested questions for an application include:

  • Please describe your treatment plan for the care and keeping of paperbacks, in detail and with footnotes.
  • How often, if ever, have you: left a book out in the rain? Colored/written in a book (childhood counts)? Folded a page to mark your place? Lost a library book by leaving it on top of your family’s car at a rest stop in Georgia and driving away, then crying for a half hour afterward until your mom told you it would find another reader? (Maybe that one’s just me.)
  • If we tallied up your past overdue fine history, how many minutes/hours/days in Disney World could we buy once it reopens?

 

Five: Create fun programs.

On the basic Storytime level, I am 100% in favor of reading books out loud, whether you have kids or not. (My friends and I are reading a P. G. Wodehouse novel over Zoom right now. Our British accents are terrible, and the entire experience has been fantastic.) But you can up your game by imitating the library’s craft nights, guest speakers (get everyone in your home to teach the rest of the household a “skill”), writing contests, puppet shows, and rocket launches. (What, your library hasn’t started those yet? I figured it was about time since they do just about everything else…)

 

Six: Promote reading in every way you can.

Whether you recommend books to friends or donate to a Little Free Library in your neighborhood; if you encourage an author or give kids page-turners for Christmas; whenever you leave a review or join a book club; every act of literary citizenship is something your real library would approve of.

 

Seven: Be traditional, yet cutting-edge; scheduled, yet flexible; focused, yet versatile; organized, yet welcoming; and generally helpful and accessible to all kinds of people in all stages of life.

You can do that, right? Because libraries sure do!

 

In all seriousness, as I think about everything libraries are to us, it makes me more excited for the day when they’ll be open again. If you’re a librarian, thank you for all you do to serve our communities! We’ll see you soon.

In the meantime, I’ve got to open up the Vast France Avenue Book Fortress of Unending Merit.

 

Using our handy tool, what would you name your in-home library?

Ask BHP: How Do You Create Covers?

When looking for a new cover-related question we hadn’t already answered in this blog series, here’s one from our survey that I found interesting: “What does the process for a cover photoshoot look like? You all find some great models!”

This was just one of many questions to our survey related to covers (if you’re interested in past cover posts, visit the archives here), so I thought I’d chat with Kristen Larson, our Art/Design Coordinator who helped me gather information and images for a blog post Lisa Bergren was doing about the cover of her book Selah.

Kristen, in addition to taking notes at all of our cover meetings and organizing our feedback, does tons of behind-the-scenes work for our covers. If you’ve ever appreciated a particularly cool prop or noticed the raised title treatment or cool texture of a cover, that’s probably her handiwork.

Q: Lots of the historical covers especially have really dramatic dresses. Where do you get the costumes?

Kristen: The costumes we use come from all over! Some we rent from out of state costume shops, some we have custom made, some we purchase, and some we rent local! Our favorite place in the Twin Cities is the Guthrie Costume Rentals, which rents out costumes from previous Guthrie performances. That’s where we got the dress we landed on for Selah.

Q: How do you decide on a cover model? Where do you find them?

Kristen: Our search for cover models is a fun one. Authors will send us the physical and personality descriptions of the character to be featured on the cover, and even include a reference photo they found online of what they were picturing in their heads when they were writing the book. We then scour our local talent agencies to find the best fit.

We sent some of the images to Lisa for her post, “Modeling for Selah,” and she also interviewed the cover model who posed for the book, so consider this a Part Two to her Part One and check out her blog (and the contest there) to learn more.

Readers, is there a costume on a book cover that you’d love to wear?

The Bethany House Grand World Tour…and Giveaway!

Wouldn’t you love to travel? To see the bright colors of India, stare at the ancient architecture of Egypt, or eat Gretel cakes in a cozy little restaurant by the sea? Oh wait. That’s right—we’re all quarantined.

I for one haven’t left my house in twenty days—yes, you read that right, twenty—and I’m getting a little stir crazy. Am I the only one? I doubt it. In light of this, Bethany House brings you a Grand World Tour, compliments of our talented authors! (And if you’re interested enough to complete your journey, the covers are all linked to Baker Book House, running a 30% off and free shipping special for online orders!)

Our first stop is A Mosaic of Wings by Kimberly Duffy, which takes on a journey from Ithaca, New York to India and back again. The author draws on her own experience in that beautiful country to bring the setting alive. She makes it easy to wonder at the lush forests, colorful insects (don’t let that scare you), and strong Indian flavors right along with Nora, the main character.

Here is a sample of the exotic beauty found in A Mosaic of Wings:

“The oxen’s rumps swayed as they pulled the two-wheeled cart, which the driver had called a mattu vandi when he met them at the guest house in Madras. Above his head, Nora watched the dirt road wind into a copse of pine trees. All around them the hills dipped and lifted, disappearing into the hazy blue horizon toward the Nilgiri Mountains in the distance.

Nora raised off the floor a little. She could just spot the large lake thickly fringed by trees. Like jewels strung across a bangle, red-roofed houses crisscrossed the roads leading to and through the Kodaikanal hill station.”

A Mosaic of Wings by Kimberly Duffy

Setting: Kodaikanal, India, July 1885

 

Next we have the West Indies in 1776, brought to you by Lisa Bergren. In her novel, Selah, the Caribbean comes bursting into full color and warmth, which is especially refreshing on these cool spring days. Who wouldn’t want to journey to this paradise? Although, as you will see if you read it, Selah is in for her own bit of world-changing drama.

Take a short excursion to Selah’s Caribbean home:

“Vervet monkeys chattered at them from the sprawling branches of a purple-flowered jacaranda tree, seeming to complain about the horses’ sudden appearance in their midst. A bird swooped overhead, crying out with his particular singsong call as if to make sure they admired his green, red, and gold breast. The wind rushed in gusts through the ferns and palms on either side of them. Selah closed her eyes and inhaled deeply, taking comfort in the sounds and sights of the island that had become her home.”

Selah by Lisa Bergren

Setting: West Indies island of Nevis, 1776

 

Leaving the lush greenery behind, we travel to Egypt, where Leif Metcalfe is trying to unscramble the mystery of his past. Not only does Kings Falling take us to the sand of Egypt, it is a world tour in itself, stopping in Africa, China, Taiwan, Afghanistan, The Netherlands, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Maryland, and Virginia.

But for our tour, we will only stop in Egypt:

“Crouched atop the mountain peak, he stared out over the rugged terrain. And that was putting it mildly. The ridges in this section of the Sahara Desert were serrated and forbidding. If you fell, you fell to your death. To his three were the glittering waters of the Red Sea. He shook his head. If he and his team had headed east, they’d have found water. Civilization. But they’d chosen the mountains for protection from the sun, heading south, then west.”

Kings Falling by Ronie Kendi

Setting: Jabal Shaib al-Banat, Egypt, present day

 

Heading back to the United States and a cooler climate, we come to Alaska. In Under the Midnight Sun, we see the proud face of mount Denali and all the flora and fauna surrounding him through the eyes of one of the first women naturalists, Taylor Hale.

Here is our sample of Alaskan beauty:

“Denali stood tall and fierce in the distance. Covered year-round in snow, today was a rare day when the High One allowed people to see him in his glory. A thin halo of clouds wrapped around his crown. The contrast of the massive mountain against the brilliant blue of the sky was glorious.

The air was still as everyone took in the grandeur before them. Lush valleys lay below them, covered in grasses of varying shades of green, the deep, almost black color of the spruce, and a riot of colorful wild flowers. Rivers snaked their way through the landscape like pathways leading to the great mountain. Thomas spotted the area where the Kahiltna Glacier cut its way down the mountain. Was there anywhere on earth that could compare to this? Was this what heaven would be like?”

Under the Midnight Sun by Tracie Peterson and Kimberley Woodhouse

Setting: Curry, Alaska, 1929

 

Remember those Gretel cakes I mentioned in the beginning? Well, we have finally come to the cozy little town by the sea where you can eat them to your heart’s content! Or at least read about eating them. The little town, weathered by the ocean and filled with lobstermen and history, has captured many hearts.

Here is your first taste of this idyllic town:

“And there it is. Down the green hill, the harbor curves in a smile. White houses dot the coast, where all is quiet, save the steady lap of waves. Offshore, a scattering of islands trail into the sea, right up to where the two peninsulas come together in a near-embrace around the protected cove. This is what makes this place a haven. Sailors seek it out as a “hurricane hole,” a place to anchor until fierce storms pass, protected as it is.”

Whose Waves These Are by Amanda Dykes

Setting: Ansel-by-the-Sea, Maine, present day

That concludes our Grand World Tour. We hope you enjoyed it and will continue to discover the beauty of far-off places from the safety of your home!

We know that there are so many books we could have included on this list, but we’ll leave that to you! To win one of the books included on this list (your choice), comment with another book with a setting you’d love to visit. I’ll choose three winners on April 16th.

April 2020 New Releases

We hope that you’re all finding plenty of time to read…and if you need new suggestions, here’s a fantastic list for you! These new releases are great for a night in, because once you start them, you won’t want to stop! If you’d like to test out the author’s writing style, click on the covers below to read an excerpt. And if you’re interested in buying them, each title is linked to the Baker Book House website, where they’re offering free (US) delivery for online orders while their store is closed. Enjoy!

 

Before I Called You Mine by Nicole Deese

Plot Summary: After many matchmaking schemes gone wrong, there’s only one goal Lauren is committed to now—the one that will make her a mother. But to satisfy the adoption agency’s requirements, she must remain single, which proves to be a problem when Joshua appears. With an impossible decision looming, she will have to choose between the two deepest desires of her heart.

 

Daughter of Cana by Angela Hunt
Jerusalem Road #1

Plot Summary: When a wedding guest tells Tasmin to have the servants fill the pitchers with water, she reluctantly obeys and is amazed when it turns into the finest wine ever tasted in Cana. But when her twin brother, Thomas, impulsively chooses to follow the Teacher from Nazareth, she decides to follow the group and do whatever she must to bring her brother home.

 

Kings Falling by Ronie Kendig
The Book of the Wars #2

Plot Summary: On a mission to recover the Book of the Wars, Leif and his team are diverted by a foretelling of formidable warriors who will decimate the enemies of the ArC, while Iskra uses her connections to hunt down the book. As they try to stop the warriors, failure becomes familiar, and the threats creep closer to home, with implications that could tear them apart.

 

Dead End by Nancy Mehl
Kaely Quinn Profiler #3

Plot Summary: When multiple corpses are found, their remains point to a serial killer with a familiar MO but who’s been in prison for over twenty years—Special Agent Kaely Quinn’s father. In order to prevent more deaths, she must come face-to-face with the man she’s hated for years. In a race against time, will this case cost Kaely her identity and perhaps even her life?

 

Have you read anything this month that you’d want to recommend to others? Tell us about it!

Ask BHP: What Goes into Your Instagram Account?

Recently we had a reader write in, “I love your Instagram! What goes into all the fun book pictures and videos, and how do you decide what books to feature?”

Hello, it’s Rachael, here! I’m the copywriter and “Instagram guru” at Bethany House. My main responsibility is to write back covers, ads, bookmarks, and almost anything else that isn’t within the pages of a book. Though, when I started working at BHP, I launched our Instagram account and was given the title “Instagram Queen.” Capturing fun photos, shooting videos, and interacting with readers has become one of my favorite things about coming into work every day.

When I saw today’s Ask BHP question, I was elated! I love talking about our Instagram account almost as much as I love the fun I have with it.

ask bethany house

One of my favorite monthly features that we do on our Instagram account is the cover design videos. Our Senior Fiction Publicist, Amy, and I sneak into our Art Director’s office and steal his files on the books she wants to discuss, and we record short videos where she talks about photoshoots, shows the sketches our designers make before the cover is designed, and tells her theory about ancient helicopter technology that left a character at the top of a snowy mountain (see the video for Hope’s Highest Mountain). I don’t get to sit in on any of the meetings where cover decisions are made, so I’m constantly learning new things when we record these videos. You can find our cover design videos under the IGTV tab or in the “Cover Design” highlight on our page.

Photo Mar 26, 8 32 04 AM

Deciding on which books I’ll be featuring for the month is simple. I keep a list of the books we are releasing every month and make sure that each one is featured on our Instagram. I’m usually found wandering around the office asking coworkers for small knick-knacks they have in their office so I can use them for Instagram photos, or “hiring” hand models to hold books for me while I snap my photos. I love the dollar section at Target because that’s where I find my best props, and Amazon sells fantastic flat lay backdrops!

I also enjoy featuring our readers’ photos on our page, so if you “bookstagram,” tag us on Instagram and use the hashtag #BHPFiction and your photo could be chosen as a Feature Friday!

Photo Oct 26, 3 01 41 PM

I’d be lying if I said that we take our Instagram completely seriously because when it comes to taking photos, I’m usually found in the middle of a new shenanigan. I’ve been caught standing on chairs to get the perfect angle, hauling my entire bookcase into our sitting area for a “great idea,” and making use of the glass from a broken lamp. And since the best lighting in the office is right by our kitchenette, I’ve been caught every time. So when someone walks by and asks, “What could you possibly be doing this time?” I point them to the letter board hanging above my computer that says, “It’s an Instagram thing; you wouldn’t understand” and give them my trademark cheesy grin!

Photo Aug 08, 1 22 48 PM

If you haven’t already, follow our Instagram page at @bethanyhousefiction for sneak peeks at our cover design process, behind-the-scenes glimpses of our photoshoots, ebook deals, and weekly book recommendations! Don’t be afraid to send us a message if you have any questions, or simply want to say hi. I love hearing from our readers!

Photo Mar 26, 8 26 21 AM

I love trying new things, so what would you love to see on our Instagram in the future?

*To ask a question of your own, fill out the form here: https://forms.gle/MyzL6QPGh3JQKzyE8 

You’re Invited to a Game Night!

In the midst of all of the stressful news about cancellations and shut-downs, here are some pieces of good news from Bethany House:

  • Our nonfiction teams are putting together a list of ebook specials on books related to prayer and anxiety to help people who might be reaching out for hope in a stressful time.
  • It’s been fun to see readers sharing online about using responsible social distancing practices to catch up on their reading.
  • Some authors have emailed me letting me know that being freed from social obligations might give them what they need to meet a deadline without pulling their hair out.
  • Others are updating us with prayer requests for additional concerns in their lives right now, from at-risk family members to kids unexpectedly home from school and making uninterrupted writing time harder to sadness over canceled research trips. That may seem like bad news, but it’s a great chance to encourage each other and pray for one another.
  • And, last but not least…We’re hosting our first-ever Bethany House virtual game night, and you’re invited!

Many of our fiction authors wanted to do something fun and cooperative given all that’s going on in the world right now, while still encouraging everyone to be safe. So even though in-person author chats may be cancelled, you can stop by the Discussion tab of our Facebook event tonight, March 19, at 7 PM Central to play a few online games hosted by our authors.

We’ll be giving away books (or book retailer gift cards), challenging our brains (a little), and laughing (a lot) as we play word games, trivia games, and drawing games together. Hope to see you there!

If you’re interested in more game-related fun, Jaime Jo Wright is putting together a landing page for COVID-19 Boredom Survival, including a list of board games you can play virtually that I compiled based on years of experience living ten hours away from my game-loving family. Be sure to check it out!

Do you have a creative approach for fighting boredom during COVID-19 downtime?

7 Reader Survey Results

Recently, we’ve been putting up fun, reading-related polls on the Bethany House Facebook page. (Be sure to vote on them—they go up on Mondays!)

Because I’ve gotten a kick out of looking at the results, I thought all of you might too. Enjoy!

 

When you use a bookmark, is it more likely to be…
181 – Some random flat thing
114 – An actual bookmark

Look at our split between the orderly people and the grab-what’s-on-hand ones. You’ll notice I didn’t give an option for…*shudder* folding a corner of the page down.

 

Have you ever read a book where the main character shares your first name?
27% – I have!
73% – Sadly, no.

It was fun to have people share their fictional namesakes in the comments, or explain why their unusual name just hasn’t come up. A place to go for inspiration for future author naming crises? Maybe so!

 

How often do you visit your local library?
39% – Around 1-2 times a month
61% – More often than that

Book people love their libraries! The “regulars” shared about their favorite programs and services that make their library a go-to location. (Did anyone else ever dream about getting locked in a library overnight? That was all I wanted as a kid, but my mom was too vigilant to let it happen. So sad.)

 

Honest truth time: have you ever walked out of a bookstore without buying something?
16% – Hahahaha…no.
84% – Maybe once or twice

Okay, so either there are more fiscally-responsible browsers out there than I’d realized or some people are deluding themselves. If the books don’t get you, the little bookish gift items certainly will!

 

How do you feel about the (mostly joking) term “book boyfriend”?
67% – Not my favorite.
33% – Love it!

This one, posted near Valentine’s Day, was a little surprising to me. Most people agreed that it’s harmless fun, but the ones who didn’t care for it thought it was weird to think of fictional people as being real-ish, while the ones who loved it just got carried away with enthusiasm for their favorite romance couples. To each their own!

 

Do you set specific yearly reading goals?
44% – Yes! It’s motivating.
56% – No, too organized.

This was actually the closest to a 50-50 split of our polls so far. Not surprising, given our audience…if we’d asked the world in general, I think the reading goal-setters would be outnumbered. Whether you’ve got a challenge or resolution to guide you or you’re totally winging it (like me), here’s to many good books in the year ahead!

 

Do you have a favorite genre of books?
67% – Of course!
33% – Don’t make me pick!

Shoutouts to all genres made it into the comments, although there were some people who read so widely they couldn’t call out one as their favorite. I’m glad we’ve got books of all kinds to keep all readers happy.

So, readers…did any of these results surprise you? And in which of these were you part of the loud-and-proud minority option?