Six Reasons It’s More Fun to Discuss Books Than Politics

There’s a time and a place for giving opinions on election results, of course, but here at Bethany House, we think any time and place is a good one for talking about books! Here’s why:

calm

One: Bringing up a favorite suspense writer or discussing the merits (or lack thereof) of a fictional hero isn’t likely to fill the room with awkward silences and irritated subject changes at holiday dinners. (Unless your family really hates books. If so, I’m sorry! Stop by the blog on Thanksgiving and we can chat about Anne of Green Gables or something.)

Two: Fewer lies, more truth. Okay, a novel is technically a lie in that it is about people who are not real and scenarios that did not happen and words that were not spoken. But given that it boldly announces that fact and that every person coming to a novel is aware that it is fictional, I don’t think that really counts. And anyway, you can learn a lot about truth from fiction, and can’t we all use a little more of that?

Three: Even a terrible book has an ending point, so you can complain about it while knowing that it probably won’t have a lasting impact on your life. (Other than making you wince every time you glimpse a picture of the cover online.) Also, you can throw it across the room if you want!

Four: The most heated arguments when discussing books are about things like charming rogue cowboy vs. witty British gentleman, series vs. standalones, face on the cover or not.

Not that those issues aren’t important…but I like the low stakes and fun tone that those “debates” have even with the most opinionated readers among us. Sometimes it feels a lot easier to “agree to disagree” about whether or not Mr. Rochester from Jane Eyre is a jerk or if speed reading is a good idea than it is to graciously disagree about policies and platforms.

Five: If someone happens to vote the same way as you, you probably don’t have much else in common with that person. There is a chance you don’t even like each other.

Whereas if someone also loves your favorite book, there is a chance you should be best friends. Or at least you’re in for a delightful conversation (“Could you believe it when…” “What do you think will happen to him in the sequel…” “Favorite character?”), the likes of which non-readers can only wish they were a part of.

Create real connections. Talk about books.

Six: A political “party” doesn’t always seem like much of a party. But a reader party is always going to be a good time. (So thanks, readers, for dropping by the blog! I love having you.)

Time for a poll of our own! Vote on the three races mentioned in reason four. (Charming rogue cowboy or witty British gentleman, series or standalones, face on the cover or not.) Which side will you take?

8 thoughts on “Six Reasons It’s More Fun to Discuss Books Than Politics

  1. Oooh, tough picks! I say Cowboy for the first one. It all depends on my mood for the second choices – sometimes I really like a series but then other times I love picking different stand alones. As for faces on the cover, I adore seeing faces, but the ones where the picture is cut off at the neck intrigue me because I can picture the hero or heroine my own way.

  2. decisions-decisions, lets see I like the rouge cowboy idea, Love both a stand alone novel and also the series, and if a face is on the cover I like it smaller in distance with something like a garden or a waterfall also,not just a large face being prominent.

  3. No face on the cover. Then I can use my imagination to picture those charming rogue cowboys and witty British gentlemen (how can one give up either?), be they in series or stand alone (of which either is good).

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